greenconcept | LAB

Laboratiorio di Ispirazione, Riflessione e Nuove Tendenze

Archive for settembre 2009

The Economist Media Convergence Remix – Did You Know? 4.0!

leave a comment »

The Economist Magazine is hosting their third annual Media Convergence Forum in New York City on October 20th and 21st. Earlier this year they asked if they could remix Did You Know?/Shift Happens with a media convergence theme and use it for their conference. Scott McLeod and I said sure, they got XPLANE to create the presentation, and the result is farther down in this post. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to attend the Forum, as I’m already missing school a few days this fall and I just couldn’t justify missing a couple more (it was very kind of The Economist to invite Scott and me), but it looks like an interesting event.

A few anticipatory FAQ’s about this version.

  1. It’s the first one that I’ve been part of that does not have a specific education focus (although I certainly think the media convergence ideas discussed in the video have great relevance for education). The idea behind the original (and subsequent) presentations was to start/continue/advance the conversation around certain ideas, so I see this hopefully doing the same thing around media convergence (and, selfishly, it will hopefully get some of the folks attending The Economist’s Media Convergence Forum to perhaps focus on some of the education ideas in the previous DYK’s). And, given the Creative Commons license on the previous versions, folks are not limited to remixes that only talk about education.
  2. They decided to designate it version 4.0 even though there have been only two previous “official” versions. But the Sony/BMG remix that is currently the hot version is typically referred to as version 3.0, so who are we to argue with the wisdom of the crowd?
  3. I should not get much, if any, credit for this one. I sent along a fair amount of statistics for their consideration, and certainly provided some feedback along the way, but otherwise didn’t have nearly as much to do with this version. Laura Bestler, Scott McLeod’s graduate assistant, did most of the research for this one, and of course XPLANE did all the graphical work. (I should, however, still get most or all of the blame if you don’t like it, since I started this whole mess.)
  4. Like the previous versions, this one is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 license, so you’re welcome to use/modify as you see fit, as long as you follow the terms of that license.Finally, an observation. In a recent email Scott McLeod wrote, “It’s amazing, the legs this thing still has.” I would have to agree. The various versions have been viewed well over 20 millions times (my guess is that with downloaded versions and audience showings it’s probably closer to 30 million times, but 20 million would be the safe number). It’s been shown to audiences large and small, educational and corporate and everything in between. It’s been shown to the leaders of our national defense and to incoming congressmen. It’s been shown by university presidents and kindergarten teachers, televangelists and politicians, folks just trying to make a buck and those trying to save the world. And this week it even made an appearance in Nancy Gibb’s essay in Time Magazine.

What does it all mean? (Well, besides the self-referential and now self-serving answer of “Shift Happens.”) I think the fact that a simple little PowerPoint (some folks would say simplistic and they would be right – it was meant to be the start of a conversation, not the entire conversation) can be viewed by so many folks and start so many conversations means that we live in a fundamentally different world than the one I (and most of you reading this) grew up in.

I know some folks would dispute that, and that’s an interesting conversation in and of itself, but if you buy that – if you buy that on so many levels the world is a fundamentally different place – then it just begs us to ask the question of whether schools have similarly transformed from when we grew up. If your answer to that question is no, as I think it probably is for a large majority of you, and if you see a problem with that, then what should we do? What is my responsibility, and your responsibility, for making the changes we believe are necessary? What are you willing to step up and do?

Written by Daniel Casarin

settembre 28, 2009 at 3:19 pm

Pubblicato su Trend

Tagged with ,

The Future Of Innovation is Holistic And Networked

leave a comment »

di Tom Hulme

Innovation can be fragmented. Inside organisations, it has a tradition of different departments working in isolation behind closed doors, with varying degrees of empathy for the needs of their consumers. That kind of scenario is changing fast as the line between the consumer and industry blurs. For it to flourish, innovation’s future lies in a less disjointed approach – we’re already seeing signs of it becoming more holistic and collaborative.

A more holistic approach is now crucial because it’s increasingly difficult to create sustainable advantage without aligning every aspect of a consumer offer.  An interesting example is Apple, which is often cited as a a world-class product developer.  However, Apple’s potency is the fruit of its innovative approach to an ecosystem of product and service design, retail, marketing and manufacturing – it certainly didn’t invent the MP3 player and arguably didn’t build the most innovative one at the time.  Its dominance is ongoing proof that holistic business ecosystems deliver the greatest competitive advantage.

This holistic perspective also needs a lateral vision. As great ideas can be discovered in diverse and unexpected places, we need to collaborate in new and surprising ways. We believe that the best ideas come from crashing, combining and contrasting disciplines and perspectives, and technology is enabling us to do this in very different ways. At IDEO, we often involve disperse and eclectic networks of consumers and experts in creating and evaluating ideas. The effect is sometimes fusion, and sometimes fission, but the results are always fruitful. In particular, it has proved to us the value of seeking, as well as expert insights, the wisdom of the crowd.

Close collaboration with the consumer can give rise to remarkably effective and powerful business models. A particularly successful example can be found where the public intersect with the TV and record industries. X-Factor is a UK TV talent show (or American Idol in the US) in which viewers vote for the performers they like best. The format has transformed a business expense (record companies searching for fresh talent) into a revenue source (viewers pay to vote). Because singers are only launched on the market when the viewers have made it clear they will buy their music, risk for the record company is mitigated.

And it’s becoming clearer and clearer that consumers want to be involved. The popularity of Starbucks’ Mystarbucksidea.com which allows consumer to create and rate new ideas and keep up to tabs with developments, is a case in point. Opening direct communication with consumers globally, at relatively low cost will soon become the norm. The future of innovation is where big impact comes from applying a holistic approach and building a portfolio of innovations rather than one hit wonders, it will be where wisdom of the crowd is the first port of call rather than the last resort.

Written by Daniel Casarin

settembre 28, 2009 at 3:14 pm

Pubblicato su Trend

Tagged with

CAPTOLOGIA – Il Modello di Bj Fogg: La Tecnologia della Persuasione

leave a comment »

di Luca De Biase

Meravigliosa disciplina, la captologia, inventata da Bj Fogg, di Stanford. Cerca di capire come le tecnologie persuadono le persone a certi comportamenti. Me ne ha parlato Arturo di Corinto e ne ha scritto sul numero di Nòva in uscita domani con il Sole 24 Ore. Nel suo libro, Tecnologia della persuasione (Apogeo, 2005), Fogg racconta: “Quando avevo dieci anni e frequentavo la quinta elementare ho studiato le tecniche della propaganda. Ogni settimana incontravamo un professore ordinario della Fresno State University che ci mostrava come i mass media e i politici usassero le tecniche della propaganda per cambiare il modo di pensare e di comportarsi delle persone. È così che imparai i nomi delle varie tecniche della propaganda e divenni in grado di riconoscerle nelle pubblicità delle riviste e negli spot televisivi. Sentivo di avere un potere in più. Era strano imparare le tecniche della propaganda in un’aula spartana, immersa nella campagna e circondata da alberi di fico, ma allo stesso tempo era affascinante. Ero stupito di come le parole, le immagini e le canzoni potessero indurre le persone a donare il sangue, a comprare nuove auto o ad arruolarsi nell’esercito”.

Ovviamente della propaganda e della persuasione, occulta o meno, si è parlato molto. Ma si è parlato meno di come l’interazione tra persone e macchine possa tradursi in una forma di persuasione. Parafrasando Winston Churchill, si può dire che gli esseri umani modellano le macchine, ma poi sono le macchine a modellare gli esseri umani. La questione è interessante perché svela ciò che non vediamo benché sia costantemente sotto i nostri occhi. Dimostra come la struttura delle tecnologie sia un messaggio capace di influire sul comportamento umano. Senza ideologia, ma con molto pragmatismo, un pizzico di etica e una dose straordinaria di ottimismo. Inutile anticipare troppo il pezzo di Arturo. Ci sono tecnologie a tunnel, che portano passo dopo passo l’utente a compiere una scelta.

Ci sono tecnologie di riduzione che facilitano le persone che devono svolgere compiti noiosi e ripetitivi. Ci sono tecnologie che cambiano il modo di usare le città, come i telefonini. Ci sono tecnologie che non persuadono, come i banner, dice Fogg (cioè proprio quelle inserzioni che dovrebbero indurre le persone a cliccare per ricevere un messaggio pubblicitario). E ci sono le tecnologie che persuadono, come Facebook che unisce la metafora dell'”amicizia” alla facilità d’uso, con bottoni a portata di mano per ogni attività di comunicazione. Già, perché le tecnologie persuasive si possono descrivere con un modello, riassunto in un famoso paper di Fogg che si può scaricare qui. Il modello di Fogg prevede che un comportamento avviene nel momento in cui convergono tre fattori: ci vuole una motivazione, una capacità e un bottone da schiacciare.

FoggModel

Il modello di Bj Fogg consente di razionalizzare quali sono le caratteristiche di un “oggetto” che persuade le persone a comportarsi in un certo modo. Ci sono tre principali motivatori che spingono le persone ad agire in un certo modo: piacere/dolore, speranza/paura, accettazione/rifiuto. Ci sono sei fattori di semplicità che abilitano le persone ad agire in un certo modo: tempo, denaro, sforzo fisico, sforzo cerebrale, devianza sociale, non-routine (se costa, se richiede sforzo, se induce a comportamenti poco convenzionali e non abituali, allora non sarà semplice). E ci sono tre tipi di “bottoni”: motivanti, facilitanti, segnalanti (insomma, bottoni che fanno venir voglia di agire, che eliminano una difficoltà o che ricordano che è il momento di fare una cosa).

E’ chiaro che i bottoni sono la parte più interessante, per chi disegna le interfacce con le quali si usano le tecnologie. Se esistono bottoni che fanno paura o inducono speranza, che fanno credere di poter superare una difficoltà, che ricordano un comportamento, quei bottoni, all’interno di una struttura tecnologica che si usa comportandosi in un certo modo, allora quei bottoni hanno a che fare con la persuasione. E un sacco di altre cose che riguardano la cultura, in senso antropologico, l’economia, la politica. Una tecnologia non è politica, ma sicuramente il suo progetto può avere a che fare con la politica.

Written by Daniel Casarin

settembre 28, 2009 at 3:05 pm

Pubblicato su Strategie

Tagged with

La Realtà Aumentata: Solo una Moda?

leave a comment »

di Flavia Cangini

Una cosa è certa, la “realtà aumentata è la moda del momento. Così, dopo la realizzazione di spazi interamente virtuali all’interno dei quali solo il protagonista era reale (la cosiddetta realtà virtuale), adesso sono gli oggetti virtuali ad entarare a far parte del “nostro” mondo. Una realtà virtuale generata dal computer che, sovrapposta alla realtà percepita dal soggetto, ne amplifica le capacità informative. Tecnologie che come spesso accade nascono in campo militare, vengono poi sfruttate in settori come quello medico, per poi venire acquisite dal modo della pubblicità, sempre in cerca di novità al fine di stupire ed affascinare il proprio pubblico.

Se all’inizio però basta poco a far sorridere e parlare le persone, basta ancora meno perché le mode svaniscano ed il piacere non derivi più dalla semplice visione di “qualcosa di nuovo”, pensiamo ad esempio al cinema e alla famosa uscita dalle fabbriche Lumière. Passato quindi l’entusiasmo per la spettacolarità del mezzo, è facile rendersi conto che esistono tante e differenti potenzialità ad essa legate. I brand stanno iniziando a sperimentarle.

Gli obiettivi che attraverso il suo impiego possono essere raggiunti variano dall’ambito ludico  a quello informativo. Qualunque sia la ragione per cui i brand la utilizzino, l’importante è che nel farlo rimangano coerenti con l’immagine che di sè vogliono venga percepita. Esempio interessante  di utilizzo ludico del mezzo è l’idea alla base della promozione del chewing gum 5 attraverso il 5 mixer. Il chewing gum, la cui campagna pubblicitaria parla di capacità del prodotto di stimolare i nostri sensi, continua a sollecitarli trasformandoci in dj. Basta dare un’occhiata al video sotto per rendersene conto.

L’utilizzo di tipo informativo del mezzo è invece più semplice da immaginare. Esempi sono le applicazioni sviluppate per l’I-phone e i “libri tridimensionali” di cui su you tube si possono trovare svariati video. Interessante anche la possibilità d’utilizzo che ci mostra BMW. Un’altra applicazione interessante che ha avuto una certa risonanza è questo software per cellulari con fotocamera per “vedere” i prezzi di edifici ed appartamenti in vendita (nel video, Nieuwe Herengracht, Amsterdam):

Per il momento la difficoltà più grande da superare perchè la realtà aumentata possa entrare a far parte della nostra quotidianità, come è avvenuto per altre tecnologie, è legata ai mezzi che ci permettono di percepire queste informazioni aggiuntive. Tecnologie come cellulari di ultima generazione e computer dotati di webcam ci fanno però pensare ad un suo possibile futuro roseo.

Written by Daniel Casarin

settembre 12, 2009 at 7:20 am

Pubblicato su Trend

Tagged with ,

The Decline of Civilization … Contributing by Social Media?

leave a comment »

di Tom Davenport

I was recently sent a PR message encouraging me to blog about a new “social media for celebrity sightings” website called “OMGICU.” (Get it?) Given the sad state of our society, the site will probably be successful. How could it not be, having combined the two greatest time-wasters of the current era: social technologies and celebrity worship. To save you from visiting the site and increasing its page view count, here’s a typical sighting:  Jill Zarin seen in Upper East Side nnekaj10 says: “And now Jill Zarin and husband have joined their daughter at California Pizza Kitchen… Jill looks great!”

Wow, that’s amazing. OMG, who is Jill Zarin? And why should we care that she is going to a boring chain restaurant? And what’s up with her anonymous husband and daughter? If she’s a “celeb,” aren’t they famous, too? Fortunately, the sightings are so far confined to New York. Boston, my home, still isn’t celebrity-ridden enough to warrant its own site — though the Boston Globe seems to become more obsessed every day with the few we do have.

A century from now, historians will probably write (assuming we can still read by then) about the factors that led to the decline of our civilization. There will be numerous indicators of major problems: a third of their children didn’t graduate from high school! They watched television for 4.5 hours a day! They quibbled over whether their president could safely address schoolchildren!

On the list of signals of imminent decline, there will be a special place on the list for OMGICU, TMZ, and their ilk. What could be more vapid than browsing and tweeting each other about the daily lives of the Tila Tequilas (I don’t really know who she is either) of the world? What better bespeaks societal breakdown than our apparently endless fascination with the rich and famous? It’s bad for the celebrities and bad for the rest of us. There is hope, however. The New York Times reports that celebrity magazines are declining dramatically in circulation. Let’s hope that their readers aren’t simply migrating online.

Written by Daniel Casarin

settembre 12, 2009 at 7:07 am

Pubblicato su Trend

Tagged with